2011 Aug. 24: AZ Pinal County: (Possible additional step could be banning fireplaces.) County given 3 years to come up with PM2.5 reduction plan: Breathe out? Pinal County is holding its breath on restrictions tied to air pollution.

2011 Aug. 24: AZ Pinal County: (Possible additional step could be banning fireplaces.) County given 3 years to come up with PM2.5 reduction plan: Breathe out? Pinal County is holding its breath on restrictions tied to air pollution.

Excerpt: It still awaits a final ruling from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on how big an area will be carved out for failing to control particulates known as PM10. State officials argued the proposed boundaries are too large.

The EPA’s decision had been expected by the end of March. It’s still pending.

In addition, the county believes the agency might have acted too soon in finding that an area encompassing a big cattle feedlot is in “nonattainment,” or out of compliance, for finer particulates known as PM2.5. Data actually show the area was in compliance before the EPA made its decision, said Don Gabrielson, director of Pinal County’s Air Quality Control District.

The finding gives the county and state three years to come up with a plan to reduce PM2.5. There’s no getting out of it, but — if the data show a clean bill of health — it could be a plan without substance, Gabrielson said.

Then there’s a third pollutant, ozone. The EPA was expected to issue new nationwide standards on ozone levels by the end of July. Heading into late August, there still hasn’t been a decision. A more stringent standard could put the county, or parts of it, in nonattainment.

Taken together, these decisions could require additional steps to reduce pollution. That could mean paving dirt roads as well as controlling emissions from tailpipes and fireplaces — just to name a few examples. There are no plans for vehicle emissions testing at the moment. And there are no plans to ban fireplaces.

But plans can’t be made till the EPA decides what to do.BBreathe out?
TriValley Central
Small particulates can be a part of airborne dust, but also can come from woodburning fireplaces, as well as other sources.
reathe out?
TriValley Central
Small particulates can be a part of airborne dust, but also can come from woodburning fireplaces, as well as other sources.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Air Monitoring & A.M. Equipment, Wood Stove regulations. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s